Biography, National Womens Month

Gloria Takes a Stand: How Gloria Steinem Listened, Wrote, and Changed the World By Jessica M. Rinker

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Back of Book:
As a young girl, Gloria Steinem thought for herself and spoke her mind. She read many books by her favorite authors and imagined herself as the heroine of the story.
Gloria wished. She read. And imagined.
But Gloria grew up during a time when women were not encouraged or even allowed, to do a lot of the things men could do: go to college, get a job, open a bank account, and more. There were restrictions that made it impossible for women to be independent or equal to men. So, Gloria set out to change that . . .
Gloria listened. She watched. And wrote.
Gloria believed. She marched. And dreamed.
My Review:
I was sent a copy of this picture book from publisher Bloomsbury Press in exchange for an honest review.
Author Jessica Rinker has beautifully captured the life and determination of Gloria Steinem. The story follows Gloria from a young girl to a powerful woman. Gloria never stopped watching, listening, and dreaming. She believed that all people were important and that everyone should be heard. As a journalist, she fought to give a voice to women who did not have one. Gloria created a magazine that was strictly for women called Ms. She published articles about women who changed laws and protected themselves from violence. She achieved many great things over the course of her career. The illustrations are vibrant and draw readers into the strength and resilience of women. The back of the book has fantastic authors note and illustrators note about the ways that Gloria influenced them. The book also has a timeline and bibliography that shares more information with readers. This is a terrific story to share during National Women’s Day.
Ages 8 and up
48 Pages

Biography, National Womens Month

A Computer Called Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon by Suzanne Slade

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Katherine knew it was wrong that African Americans didn’t have the same rights as others–as wrong as 5+5=12. She knew it was wrong that people thought women could only be teachers or nurses–as wrong as 10-5=3. And she proved everyone wrong by zooming ahead of her classmates, starting college at fifteen, and eventually joining NASA, where her calculations helped pioneer America’s first manned flight into space, its first manned orbit of Earth, and the world’s first trip to the moon!
My Review:
I received a copy of this picture book from author Suzanne Slade in exchange for an honest review.
Suzanne Slade is a gifted author! Her books never fail to sweep me into the story. “A Computer Called Katherine” is no exception. The book follows Katherine from her childhood love of mathematics to her important work with NASA. The book focuses on Katherine’s courage and determination to keep moving forward. She chose to work in a career with all men. This meant that Katherine had to work twice as hard to prove that she was just as capable of solving equations as they were. The illustrations by debut illustrator Veronica Miller Jamison are bright and detailed. I love the way she incorporated numbers within the illustrations. I loved reading the authors note in the back of the book about how she pulled from her own personal experience working at NASA. The back of the book also had a fantastic timeline that makes this book perfect for book reports. This is an excellent book to share for National Women’s Month and any STEM unit.
Ages 5 and up
40 Pages

Biography, National Womens Month

Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life: Hollywood Legend and Brilliant By Laurie Wallmark

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Back of Book:
To her adoring public, Hedy Lamarr was a glamorous movie star, widely considered the most beautiful woman in the world. But in private, she was something more: a brilliant inventor. And for many years only her closest friends knew her secret. Now Laurie Wallmark and Katy Wu, who collaborated on Sterling’s critically acclaimed picture-book biography Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code, tell the inspiring story of how, during World War Two, Lamarr developed a groundbreaking communications system that still remains essential to the security of today’s technology.
My Review:
I received a copy of this picture book from author Laurie Wallmark in exchange for an honest review.
I have been a long time fan of Hedy Lamarr’s acting career. It wasn’t until recently that I learned what a strong and intelligent woman Hedy was. The story follows Hedy from childhood in Austria to her amazing career in Holywood. The most intriguing part of this story to me was the fact that Hedy invented such a complicated system. She worked hard with George Antheil to create a secure torpedo guidance system. Sadly the system she created would be taken and Hedy didn’t receive credit for many years. Amazingly Heldy continued to do anything she could for the country she loved. She sold war bonds and held dances for the soldiers during World War 2. Laurie created a well researched and fascinating biography about one amazing woman. Katy Wu’s illustrations are truly stunning and bring depth to the life of Hedy Lamarr. The back of the book has a timeline of Hedys life, a list of her movies , as well as more information about the Secret Communications System. This is an excellent book for National Women’s Month or any unit on inventions. I highly recommend it!
Ages 6 and up
48 Pages