William Still and His Freedom Stories: The Father of the Underground Railroad Written & Illustrated By Don Tate

Back of Book:
William Still’s parents escaped slavery but had to leave two of their children behind, a tragedy that haunted the family. As a young man, William went to work for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, where he raised money, planned rescues, and helped freedom seekers who had traveled north. And then one day, a strangely familiar man came into William’s office, searching for information about his long-lost family. Could it be?
Motivated by his own family’s experience, William began collecting the stories of thousands of other freedom seekers. As a result, he was able to reunite other families and build a remarkable source of information, including encounters with Harriet Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, and William and Ellen Craft.
My Review:
I received a copy of this picture book from PeachTree Publishing in exchange for an honest review.
“William Still and His Freedom Stories: The Father of the Underground Railroad” By Don Tate is a fascinating nonfiction narrative that introduces readers to the life and work of William Still. Readers follow William from his childhood as a slave to his work with the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. William realized the importance of collecting the stories of thousands of others seeking their freedom. William was able to build a remarkable source of interviews, stories, and facts that allowed him to reunite families, and document history. The illustrations by Don Tate are rich in color and history. Like many people, I have never learned about the man who was named the “Father of the Underground Railroad.” This is a great resource about an unknown hero of the Civil War Era. I look forward to sharing it with my classroom.
Ages 6 and up
40 Pages

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