Rescuing the Declaration of Independence: How We Almost Lost the Words That Built America By Anna Crowley Redding & Edwin Fotheringham

Back of Book:

These are the words that helped found our nation. Today the Declaration of Independence is one of the United States’ most heavily guarded treasures, but during the War of 1812 it would have been destroyed if not for one man whose story has nearly been forgotten by time. Come along on this historic adventure and learn how one ordinary clerk did a truly extraordinary thing.

As a clerk for the State Department, Stephen Pleasonton spent his days quietly immersed in paperwork. He never expected to receive an urgent message telling him that the British army was on its way to the capital. And that the documents that Stephen was entrusted with—such as the original Declaration of Independence and the original Constitution—were all in danger!

It fell on Stephen to get our nation’s most cherished and priceless artifacts safely out of Washington!

My Review:

I received a digital copy of this picture book from author Anna Crowley Redding in exchange for an honest review. 

I am a huge history buff, so anytime I see a historical picture book about an unsung hero I get very excited! I had never heard of Stephen Pleasonton and was amazed at the part he played during the War of 1812. This book immediately draws readers into the difficult and dangerous task of collecting precious documents before the British arrived. Even when Stephen was told that he was overreacting, he continued to gather our nation’s history. The illustrations by Edwin Fotheringham sweep readers away to a different time and place. Each picture shows the detailed documents that made America different. The back of the book has more information about Stephen Pleasonton, The Declaration on Independence, and The Articles of Confederation. 

This is a perfect book for any Revolutionary time unit and an amazing look at one mans extraordinary deed to preserve the history of America. 

Ages 5 and up

40 Pages 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: