History, National Womens Month

Ruby’s Hope: A Story of How the Famous “Migrant Mother” Photograph Became the Face of of the Great Depression By Monica Kulling

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Back of Book:
Dorothea Lange’s Depression-era “Migrant Mother” photograph is an icon of American history. Behind this renowned portrait is the story of a family struggling against all odds to survive.
Dust storms and dismal farming conditions force young Ruby’s family to leave their home in Oklahoma and travel to California to find work. As they move from camp to camp, Ruby sometimes finds it hard to hold on to hope. But on one fateful day, Dorothea Lange arrives with her camera and takes six photographs of the young family. When one of the photographs appears in the newspaper, it opens the country’s eyes to the reality of the migrant workers’ plight and inspires an outpouring of much-needed support.
My Review:
I received a copy of this picture book from Page Street Publishing in exchange for an honest review.
The Dust Bowl was a difficult time in the history of our nation. Rubys Hope is a realistic and beautiful glimpse into the lives of the migrant workers who were deeply affected by the Great Depression. The story follows a young named Ruby as she and her family navigate the difficulties of finding work after the Dust Bowl wiped out the crops. Everything changes when a photographer named Dorothea Lange comes to capture the realities of how these families are surviving. The illustrations by Sarah Dvojack are a stunning blend of muted and bright colors. Readers are able to visualize how people during this time period lived. The back of the book has more on “The Migrant Mother” and the impact she had on the world. This is a fantastic picture book that can be used for a Great Depression unit or for National Women’s studies.
Ages 6 and up
40 Pages

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