Biography, Black History Month

Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop: The Sanitation Strike of 1968 By Alice Faye Duncan

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Back of Book:
In February 1968, two African American sanitation workers were killed by unsafe equipment in Memphis, Tennessee. Outraged at the city’s refusal to recognize a labor union that would fight for higher pay and safer working conditions, sanitation workers went on strike. The strike lasted two months, during which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was called to help with the protests. While his presence was greatly inspiring to the community, this unfortunately would be his last stand for justice. He was assassinated in his Memphis hotel the day after delivering his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” sermon in Mason Temple Church.
My Review:
I revived a copy of this book from author Alice Faye Duncan in exchange for an honest review.
Run don’t walk to your nearest bookstore today and grab this amazing, haunting story about the Sanitation Shrike of 1968. Alice Faye Duncan took a historical event and brought it to life! The story follows a young girl as she watches her daddy stand up for what he believes in. The story is inspired by and teacher and her memories of participating in the strike when she was a child. The text is written using poetry. Each page holds a title with a verse. The illustrations are unique and rich in texture and color. The back of the book has a fantastic timeline as well as a list of museums that readers can visit. This is a perfect book to add to any Martin Luther King Jr. or history unit. It is a book that King himself would be happy to read.
Ages 9 and up
40 Pages

Click Here to Buy on Amazon

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